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CfE Es and Os: Literacy and English

CfE Experiences and Outcomes

Using film in a range of classroom activities can contribute to wide learning in the curriculum and deliver many Experiences and Outcomes.

Film literacy reinforces and enhances all the same skills as literacy explored within a piece of writing - after all, we talk about "reading" a film. (You can learn more about this in the How Screen Narrative Works section.) Film has the added benefit of allowing pupils who struggle with the written word (such as those with dyslexia or ASD or ESL pupils) to demonstrate their decoding and comprehension skills in a different context.

Below is a list - by no means exhaustive - of some of the Literacy experiences and outcomes you can help deliver through work with film.

Literacy and English

Listening and watching

  • I enjoy exploring events and characters in stories and other texts, sharing my thoughts in different ways.
  • I regularly select and listen to or watch texts for enjoyment and interest, and I can express how well they meet my needs and expectations, and I can give reasons, with evidence, for my personal response. I can regularly select subject, purpose, format and resources to create texts of my choice, and am developing my own style.
  • When I engage with others, I can respond in ways appropriate to my role, show that I value others’ contributions and use these to build on thinking.
  • I listen or watch for useful or interesting information and I use this to make choices or learn new things.
  • As I listen or watch, I can: • identify and give an accurate account of the purpose and main concerns of the text, and can make inferences from key statements • identify and discuss similarities and differences between different types of text • use this information for different purposes.
  • As I listen or watch, I can make notes and organise these to develop thinking, help retain and recall information, explore issues and create new texts, using my own words as appropriate.
  • I can independently select ideas and relevant information for different purposes, organise essential information or ideas and any supporting detail in a logical order, and use suitable vocabulary to communicate effectively with my audience.

Reading

  • To help me understand stories and other texts, I ask questions and link what I am learning with what I already know.
  • I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by responding to literal, inferential, evaluative and other types of questions, and by asking different kinds of questions of my own.
  • I can show my understanding of what I listen to or watch by giving detailed, evaluative comments, with evidence, about the content and form of short and extended texts.
  • To help me develop an informed view, I can distinguish fact from opinion, and I am learning to recognise when my sources try to influence me and how useful these are.
  • Within real and imaginary situations, I share experiences and feelings, ideas and information in a way that communicates my message.
  • I enjoy exploring events and characters in stories and other texts and I use what I learn to invent my own, sharing these with others in imaginative ways.
  • When listening and talking with others for different purposes, I can: • communicate information, ideas or opinions • explain processes, concepts or ideas • identify issues raised, summarise findings or draw conclusions.
  • As I listen and take part in conversations and discussions, I discover new words and phrases which I use to help me express my ideas, thoughts and feelings.
  • I am developing confidence when engaging with others within and beyond my place of learning. I can communicate in a clear, expressive way and I am learning to select and organise resources independently.
  • I regularly select and read, listen to or watch texts which I enjoy and find interesting, and I can explain why I prefer certain texts and authors.
  • Before and as I read, I can apply strategies and use resources independently to help me read a wide variety of texts and/or find the information I need.
  • Using what I know about the features of different types of texts, I can find, select, sort, summarise, link and use information from different sources.
  • I can make notes, organise them under suitable headings and use them to understand information, develop my thinking, explore problems and create new texts, using my own words as appropriate.
  • To help me understand stories and other texts, I ask questions and link what I am learning with what I already know.
  • To show my understanding across different areas of learning, I can: • identify and consider the purpose, main concerns or concepts and use supporting detail • make inferences from key statements • identify and discuss similarities and differences between different types of text.

Writing

  • I enjoy creating texts of my choice and I regularly select subject, purpose, format and resources to suit the needs of my audience.
  • As I play and learn, I enjoy exploring interesting materials for writing and different ways of recording my experiences and feelings, ideas and information.
  • I can consider the impact that layout and presentation will have on my reader, selecting and using a variety of features appropriate to purpose and audience.
  • I can use my notes and other types of writing to help me understand information and ideas, explore problems, make decisions, generate and develop ideas or create new text. I recognise the need to acknowledge my sources and can do this appropriately.
  • Within real and imaginary situations, I share experiences and feelings, ideas and information in a way that communicates my message.
  • By considering the type of text I am creating, I can independently select ideas and relevant information for different purposes, and organise essential information or ideas and any supporting detail in a logical order.

More Help

For more information about BGE Literacy Es and Os achieved through film education and suggested activities, check out our guide to BGE Literacy Es and Os Met Using Film.

You might also be interested in signing up for this free online course: Using Film to Teach Literacy Online and in the Classroom.

While there are currently no formal Es and Os for film studies, Screen Scotland have developed sample BGE Fourth Level Film Studies checklists based on English and Literacy Es and Os. These cover the most important outcomes from the study of fiction and non-fiction film and one for making a film. There is also a checklist for a combined approach as, in order to make a film, you have to study one - and vice versa! This should help you to develop a checklist suited to your own class.